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San Diego dental implants

How dental implants work

San Diego dental implants

dental implants

Modern dental technology has come a long way in oral health. You no longer have limited options when you lose a tooth! Dental implants don’t require reducing other teeth, as a tooth-supported bridge does. Because nearby teeth are not altered to support the implant, more of your own teeth are left intact, improving long-term oral health. Plus, individual implants also allow easier access between teeth, improving oral hygiene.

Following osseointegration, the implant is exposed and the gum (gingiva) is shaped with the aid of a gingiva former. After 10-14 days, an impression can be taken, which acts as a basis for the dental technician to make your prosthesis.

Prosthetic Restoration

When your prosthesis is ready, it is fitted into your own dentition by securing it to the implant or implants. Depending on the type of fixed restoration, it can be screwed or cemented in place. In the case of removable solutions, your dentist will screw the abutments that will anchor your prosthesis to the implant and then fit the prosthesis.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

A removable implant supported denture (also an implant supported overdenture is a type of dental prosthesis which is not permanently fixed in place. The dental prosthesis can be disconnected from the implant abutments with finger pressure by the wearer. To enable this, the abutment is shaped as a small connector (a button, ball, bar or magnet) which can be connected to analogous adapters in the underside of the dental prosthesis. Facial prosthetics, used to correct facial deformities (e.g. from cancer treatment or injuries) can utilise connections to implants placed in the facial bones.[8] Depending on the situation the implant may be used to retain either a fixed or removable prosthetic that replaces part of the face.

In orthodontics, small diameter dental implants, referred to as Temporary Anchorage Devices (or TADs) can assist tooth movement by creating anchor points from which forces can be generated. For teeth to move, a force must be applied to them in the direction of the desired movement. The force stimulates cells in the periodontal ligament to cause bone remodeling, removing bone in the direction of travel of the tooth and adding it to the space created. In order to generate a force on a tooth, an anchor point (something that will not move) is needed. Since implants do not have a periodontal ligament, and bone remodelling will not be stimulated when tension is applied, they are ideal anchor points in orthodontics. Typically, implants designed for orthodontic movement are small and do not fully osseointegrate, allowing easy removal following treatment.

How dental implants work

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